Please join us for the Portland Human Resource Management Association (PHRMA) January Luncheon on January 16, 2013 from 11:30am – 1:00pm at the Portland Doubletree Hotel (LloydCenter). Following the luncheon will be an afternoon workshop from 1:30pm-4:00pm that you will not want to miss!

Luncheon Topic: The Soft Skills Revival: The New Take on People Skills That Businesses are Buzzing About
Cost: Member – $25; Guest – $35
Register online: http://www.portlandhrma.org/calendar.cfm
HRCI Credit Pending

Luncheon Session Summary:
In the past, organizations often resisted soft skills training because they couldn’t clearly see the connection to their business goals. This has changed, and now there is a growing demand for what we used to call soft skills training. This program explores the reasons why businesses are now eager for employee development programs that enhance emotional intelligence and personal leadership. Further, the program describes the shift from teaching interpersonal skills to facilitating a learning experience that is personally transformative. Participants will participate in such a learning experience.

To identify 1) a soft skills shortage among job applicants and within the workforce and 2) one method for improving soft skills that integrates recent thinking on facilitating personal change.

Workshop Topic: Putting Trust Back in Business: How to Build and Maintain Credibility in a Transparent World
Cost: Workshop Member- $50; Workshop Guest- $65
Register online: http://www.portlandhrma.org/calendar.cfm
HRCI Credit Pending

Workshop Session Summary:
Recent studies show a strong link between trust and both productivity and innovation. This program shows the research, explores the connection, and digs deep into the four elements of trust: competence, transparency, predictability, and genuine concern. Participants will engage in an appreciative inquiry exercise that will illustrate these points. They will also use a trust self-assessment tool to identify specific behaviors they can engage in to strengthen trust among individuals and within teams.

The learning objectives are 1) the ability to identify the four elements of trust, 2) the demonstrated ability to identify specific behaviors associated with each element of trust, and 3) the specific behaviors participants can begin or stop doing to strengthen trust in their relationships with others.

Speaker Bio:
David Rabiner is a speaker, educator, and author on leadership, influence, and personal effectiveness. Since 1993, he has averaged more than 100 workshops or presentations annually and has worked with more than 1,900 groups in 46 states and 12 countries.
David graduated from the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. Prior to forming Rabiner Resources, lnc., in 1993, he enjoyed a successful 15-year career in radio news broadcasting, in executive-level public service, and as an entrepreneur.
In 2003, David passed rigorous standards to earn the coveted Certified Speaking Professional, the international benchmark for speaking excellence. He was re-certified in 2008 and is one of fewer than 600 speakers worldwide that currently hold the designation

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